With General Crook in the Indian Wars
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With General Crook in the Indian Wars

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Published by L. Osborne in Palo Alto .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Crook, George, -- 1828-1890.,
  • Indians of North America -- Wars -- 1866-1895.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby John G. Bourke.
The Physical Object
Pagination59 p.
Number of Pages59
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14713552M

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George C. Crook was a career United States Army officer, Crook is most noted for his distinguished service during the Civil War and the Indian the s, the Apache nicknamed him Nantan Lupan, which means “Grey Wolf.”. Crook was born to Thomas and Elizabeth Matthews Crook on September 8, , on a farm near Taylorsville, was nominated to the United States Military. George Crook () Considered the army's greatest Indian fighter, General George Crook earned that reputation by developing a respect for his enemy that carried over into his relationships.   This definitive chronicle of Gen. George Crook by his loyal aide de camp offers a firsthand account of the Arizona Territory and American Indian Wars. After serving more than fifteen years with Gen. George Crook, John G. Bourke, his right-hand man, sat down to write of his time with the legendary US Army officer in the post–Civil War : Skyhorse Publishing. Crook, George; Cozzens, Peter // Eyewitness to the Indian Wars, Volume 1;, p This article reprints the text of an interview with U.S. Army General George Crook about the troubles caused by the Apache Indians in Arizona and his reasons why the captured Chiricahuas should be left to the control of the army, which appeared in the July 9.

With General Crook in the Indian wars. Palo Alto, Lewis Osborne, (OCoLC) Named Person: George Crook; George Crook: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: John Gregory Bourke; Frederic Remington; Lewis Osborne.   George Crook was one of the most prominent military figures of the late-nineteenth-century Indian Wars. Yet today his name is largely unrecognized despite the important role he played in such pivotal events in western history as the Custer fight at the Little Big Horn, the death of Crazy Horse, and the Geronimo : University of Oklahoma Press.   General George Crook, was head of Departiment of Arizona, after the forced capitulation of Apache. But Geronimo was still on the loose. Indians used to call him Nantan Lupan (Grey Wolf), showing him their respect. At that time, US Generals experienced a large, common employ of Indian Scouts to help them finding their quarries.   This definitive chronicle of Gen. George Crook by his loyal aide de camp offers a firsthand account of the Arizona Territory and American Indian Wars. After serving more than fifteen years with Gen. George Crook, John G. Bourke, his right-hand man, sat down to write of his time with the legendary US Army officer in the post–Civil War West.4/5(1).

George Crook in the “Indian Fighting Army” Following up his earlier George Crook: From the Redwoods to Appomattox, which covered Crook’s early life and service in the Civil War, Ma g id gives us the second of his projected three-volume life of the general. This is a very readable and nuanced account of Crook’s years in the West. The definitive look at one of the most famous American generals of the American Indian Wars. After serving over fifteen years with General George Crook, John Gregory Bourke, his right-hand man, sat down to write of his time with the legendary US Army officer in the post Civil War ed on: Febru Paul Magid has, with this book, again demonstrated that he is the preeminent historian of George Crook. "The Gray Fox" is an incisive treatment of the controversial Indian Fighter, which begins with Crook's promotion to Lt. Colonel in , where "From the Redwoods to Appomattox" leaves off, and ends with the death of Crazy Horse in /5. Renowned for his prominent role in the Apache and Sioux wars, General George Crook (–90) was considered by William Tecumseh Sherman to be his greatest Indian-fighting general. Although Crook was feared by Indian opponents on the battlefield, in defeat the tribes found him a true friend and advocate who earned their trust and friendship.